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Tutorials > Fish Finder Tutorial >

Lowrance Fishfinder Tutorial

HDS Gen3

HDS Gen3 fishfinder/chartplotter displays are a revolutionary step forward for the marine electronics industry. Technology is not slowing down. Are you keeping up? HDS Gen3 is a bottom machine that goes well beyond finding.

HDS Gen3 gives birth to an exclusive new interface that allows you to fully control functions through either multi-touch or full key pad operation depending on user preference and on-the-water conditions.

Superior Lowrance Target Separation - This hi-tech generation advances the award-winning Lowrance® target separation by combining simultaneous use of cutting-edge CHIRP sonar technology and our widely-held StructureScan™ HD sonar imaging to produce unparalleled views of fish holding near the bottom and around structure.

Visibly Better Screens - In order to better replicate the underwater home where fish live and how you interact with the display, Lowrance has developed and specially tuned a visibly better screen delivering better definition of sonar returns, dynamic dimensionality in menu elements and a layered, strong and subtle color scheme for striking on-screen detail.

Obviously Faster Interface - To drive the latest in electronics technology the HDS Gen3 benefits the angler by turning out the fastest HDS® ever. Those keys are made for pushing. And, we know it is important for you to feel how the touch screen functions. A remarkably fast processor ensures that HDS Gen3 will perform the way you fish.

Full Boat Integration And System Control - The advantages of new technology don’t stop there. Total control of trolling-motor, outboard motor and entire electronics system is now achievable in one integrated HDS system. Lowrance SmartSteer™ allows seamless switching from electric-steer trolling-motor and outboard pilot steering. Add-in any NMEA 2000® certified device and available engine interface cables or Lowrance data sensors for a professional-level system that is effortless-to-install and easy-to-use.

Enhancing your time on-the-water, GoFree™ wireless download and upload of maps, new software and cool new fishing apps extends your control into a cloud enabled digital shopping experience.

More Features

  • Easy To See: large, LED-backlit, multi-touch, widescreen display
  • Simple To USE: Improved Lowrance interface with touchscreen or keypad option provides lightning-fast, fingertip access to all HDS features.
  • Most Advanced Fishfinder Technology: View CHIRP Sonar and StructureScan® HD at the same time to get the best possible view of fish and structure, both below and to the side of your boat
  • Quickly Make Adjustments: With an enhanced, faster processor and intuitive user-interface features -- including scrolling menus, cursor assist, snap-to setting markers and innovative preview panes with quick-touch slider bars.
  • Stay Connected: Integrated wireless connectivity with the Lowrance GoFree App and other onboard devices – view and control select HDS Gen3 displays wirelessly using supported tablets and smartphones.
  • GoFree® Cloud-Enabled: Shop, purchase, download and immediately use Insight maps, and other 3rd third-party maps from GoFree partners, directly from the home screen. In addition, GoFree also enables Insight Genesis users the ability to upload sonar logs, and download up-to-date, personalized contour maps and contribute to the community based Social Map directly from your device.
  • More Is Better: Plug-and-play compatibility with Lowrance performance modules -- Broadband Radar, SonicHub Marine Audio, SiriusXM® Marine Weather and audio, Class B AIS and DSC VHF -- as well as industry-leading technologies, such as SmartSteer control for MotorGuide PinpointGPS and the Lowrance Outboard Pilot.
  • Connects and communicates with HDS Gen2 Touch and HDS Gen2 multifunction displays
  • Dual Ethernet networking ports
  • Micro-C connection for NMEA 2000® devices
  • Video input via optional adapter cable
  • Same flush-mount cutout and bracket as HDS Gen2 Touch units
  • Supported by Lowrance Advantage Service program


  • Internal GPS antenna – with 10Hz position update rate provides ultra-accurate trails, smoother chart performance and maximum position accuracy. Supports WAAS/EGNOS/MSAS corrections.
  • Extensive mapping options – HDS Gen3 includes built-in Insight USA charts for Coastal and Inland US waters and a world background reference map, and is compatible with the most expansive selection of cartography on the market. Options include Insight™ HD, Insight™ PRO, Insight Genesis™, Navionics®, C-MAP MAX-N+, Insight™ TOPO and more. All charting options can be used with Insight Planner™ PC planning software. Visit the GoFreeMarine.com for more details.
  • Insight Genesis™ personalized maps – Make your own maps using recorded sonar logs, upload data to Insight Genesis account, view secure custom chart detail online, add optional vegetation or bottom-hardness overlays, download to an SD card and use on the water. Plus, you now have the option to share maps with the Insight Genesis Social Map community.
  • Multi-view and chart sharing – View two charts simultaneously, in 2D or 3D perspective view, with independent control, range and overlay capabilities. Plus, get the maximum from your chart card purchases; buy one map card and view it on all Ethernet networked HDS Gen3, HDS Gen2 or Gen2 Touch chartplotter displays.
  • Dual microSD card slots


  • Built-in CHIRP Sonar – Dominate with greater sensitivity, improved target resolution and superior noise rejection for clearer, easy-to-see bait fish and game fish targets. Delivers multiple CHIRP and Broadband Sounder frequencies from a single transducer.
  • Built-in StructureScan® HD sonar imaging – Enjoy picture-like 180-degree views of structure and fish below your boat. Requires optional StructureScan® HD transducer.
  • Built-in Broadband Sounder™ – Display and mark gamefish, baitfish and structure at higher speeds and at greater depths - from 1 to over 3,000* feet.
  • StructureMap™ HD capability – Use live or recorded StructureScan® HD logs to create stunning underwater images of lakes, rivers or seafloor. StructureMap can be viewed as an overlay, and toggled on and off to provide the ultimate in situational awareness in relation to both chart and bottom detail.
  • DownScan Overlay™ technology overlays DownScan Imaging onto CHIRP Sonar or BroadBand Sounder.
  • TrackBack™ to review and save key hotspots - Scroll-back thru sonar or StructureScan® HD imaging history to review structure or fish targets and pinpoint the location with a waypoint.
  • SpotlightScan™ Sonar ready – optional add-on delivers a new level of angler-controlled surround-scanning view to provide picture-like images of key fishing areas.

Elite Series


Standalone Fishfinder and Combo Models

All NEW selection of CHIRP sonar fishfinders and combined fishfinder / chartplotter models, available in 4, 5, 7 and 9-inch displays.



Lowrance® CHIRP Advantages

Until CHIRP, most fishfinders used a single-frequency signal, considered to be the sonar standard for marking depths as well as fish targets. And, 200 kHz is generally considered a good single-frequency option for shallow- to mid-range depths (to around 300 feet) and 50 kHz is a good option for greater depths. Although Lowrance® sonar is considered to be the best fishfinder in the world; single-frequency operation does have its drawbacks. For example, to increase sensitivity, you increase clutter on the display—both near the surface and in the water column. But, if you reduce sensitivity, you could miss fish targets. Because CHIRP sonar uses multiple frequencies at once, you are able to see fish targets better than ever before. Individual game fish are now more easily identified in or around bait schools, and game fish are more easily seen when holding near structure or the bottom. You also get the clear benefit of a clutter-free display. And, all of these advantages are available whether you’re fishing an inland lake, or off the coast on a deeper saltwater trip.

Lowrance CLARITY Advantages

Because Lowrance® fishfinders give you the option of using more than one CHIRP Sonar signal, it's important to understand which one is right for your fishing situation.

Most frequently used for freshwater as well as more shallow coastal areas. It provides the greatest detail for tracking smaller objects, like your lure, or identifying game fish from bait fish, as well as game fish that are near structure or on the bottom.

Wide coverage makes this frequency best for covering large areas while searching for structure or fish. However, this option is not as detailed as High CHIRP and will not penetrate as deep as Low CHIRP.

Provides the greatest depth performance, while marking fish targets throughout the entire water column.

The goal was to make CHIRP sonar affordable to all anglers and that is exactly what we are doing with the Elite CHIRP sonar series.

Elite-9 and 9x CHIRP models — All-NEW, easy-to-use, 9-inch fishfinder/chartplotter combining the benefits of CHIRP Sonar with DownScan Imaging™ for the best possible view below your boat, the Elite-9 CHIRP fishfinder/chartplotter features greater sensitivity, improved target resolution and superior noise rejection for clearer, easy-to-see bait fish and game fish targets – all on a super-bright, LED-backlit widescreen display, built-in GPS antenna and high-definition mapping options. Nav+ models comes pre-packaged with Navionics+ chart card featuring full coastal and inland coverage of the U.S. and Canada, plus the Great Lakes, Alaska, Hawaii and the Bahamas – plus online access to Navionics chart enhancements including Freshest Data, Sonar Charts and Community Edits.

Create your own map from real sonar data that you record with Insight Genesis. Or, select optional map upgrades including Lake Insight™ and Nautic Insight™ PRO and HD, Navionics HotMaps® Premium and Fishing Hotspots® PRO. Global chart upgrade options include Navionics+ and Navionics Nav+ and Jeppesen C-MAP MAX-N.

Quick access page selector menu to all features using one-thumb operation. Multi-Window Display lets you quickly and easily choose from pre-set page layouts — including a three-panel view with chart, CHIRP Sonar and DownScan Imaging™. NMEA 2000® connectivity allows waypoint sharing among networked chartplotters, plus the ability to add an optional temp sensor, Point-1 GPS antenna with heading sensor, as well as a Class-B AIS receiver.

Elite-7 and 7x CHIRP models — a 7-inch fishfinder/chartplotter that combines CHIRP Sonar with DownScan Imaging™ and Broadband Sounder™ providing greater sensitivity, improved target resolution and superior noise rejection for clearer, easy-to-see bait fish and game fish targets. Built-in GPS antenna. Plus a detailed U.S. map featuring more than 3,000 lakes and rivers and coastal contours to 1,000 feet. Nav+ models comes pre-packaged with Navionics® Nav+ cartography.

Elite-4 and 4x CHIRP and Elite-5 and 5x CHIRP models — easy-to-use fishfinder/chartplotter models that combine CHIRP Sonar with DownScan Imaging™ technology, a super-bright, LED-backlit color display, built-in GPS antenna and high-definition mapping featuring a detailed U.S. map with more than 3,000 lakes and rivers and coastal contours to 1,000 feet. The Elite-4 and -5 CHIRP models include many of the proven features of the Elite-7 and Elite-9 units.

Elite CHIRP Series Features

All Elite models share these innovative fish-finding features .
  • Brighter Displays: Maximum visibility and viewing detail in ALL conditions.
  • Broadband Sounder™ – Built-in to the new Lowrance HDI Skimmer® transducer design, Broadband Sounder™ technology is ideal for marking fish arches and tracking lure action.
  • DownScan Imaging™ (DSI) – Delivers easy-to-understand, picture-like views of structure and bottom detail.
  • DownScan Overlay™: combine sonar and imaging views for a full-screen display to identify fish targets near picture-like images of structure.
  • Trackback™ Feature: Easily scrollback through sonar history to review and zoom-in for a closer look at bottom structure, baitfish and game fish. Save a waypoint on chartplotter models to quickly find that location again — eliminating the need to circle back and retrace the path.
  • Multi-Window Displays – Choose from as many as eight preset page layouts, including up to three panels in split-screen mode to view chart, sonar and DownScan Imaging™ - all on one screen simultaneously.
  • Easy Installation: Plug-and-play functionality saves you time and hassles, and works with existing Lowrance blue-connector cables.
  • Reliable Navigation that's easy to use - Highly accurate, built-in GPS antenna, plus a detailed U.S. background map, with optional charting upgrades to Navionics® Nav+ and HotMaps® Premium, Fishing Hotspots® PRO as well as Lake Insight and Nautic Insight PRO. Works with high-capacity micro SD cards.
  • Insight Genesis™ Lowrance Elite Series Features, Elite-7 HDI– an exclusive online service that allows you to create free customized maps based on your own survey data. Make your own maps using recorded sonar logs. Upload data to Insight Genesis account, view secure custom chart detail online, adjust contour lines, add optional vegetation or bottom-hardness overlays, download to an SD card and use on the water.
  • Protected by a one-year limited warranty and the Lowrance Advantage Service program.

Elite CHIRP Sonar Features


CHIRP sonar advantages:

  • Easier to identify and distinguish bait and game fish targets
  • Better target identification at greater depths
  • Mark fish clearly at faster boat speeds

Elite CHIRP Sonar Advantages:

  • Multiple CHIRP settings from a single transducer
  • CHIRP sonar performance with a greater number of affordable transducers, including the Lowrance HDI Skimmer®
  • View multiple CHIRP sonar settings on one display

Lowrance Transducer Information


Transducer Selection

See our Transducer Selection Guide

Choosing a transducer is an important part of designing your sonar system. The sonar image on your display starts with the transducer, so its characteristics greatly affect the performance of the system. With so many different technologies, transducer selection may seem mystifying. The main points to consider are how will it be mounted, what views do I want and what frequencies do I need.

  • How will it be mounted?
    • Most inland water boats are fitted with a transom or a shoot-thru-hull broadband sounder™ transducer as well as a second broadband sounder transducer on the bottom of the trolling motor, if equipped. Today, a transom mounted StructureScan HD® transducer can be found on most inland fishing boats.
    • Most bay/flats/offshore boats are fitted with a transom mount or a thru-hull transducer.
  • What views do I want?
    • Broadband and CHIRP can be accomplished with the same transducer—the difference is how the signal from the transducer is processed by the sonar module.
    • StructureScan HD requires a different style of transducer
    • SpotlightScan requires a dedicated transducer mounted to a foot-controlled trolling motor.
  • What frequencies do I need?
    • Here is a quick breakdown:
      • Low CHIRP or 50kHz—Lower frequency means higher power for deep-water fishing.
      • Medium CHIRP or 83kHz—Specifically designed to give the widest coverage area, 83 kHz is ideal for watching a bait under the transducer in shallow water.
      • High CHIRP or 200kHz—Higher frequencies display a higher resolution image making it easy to discern fish from structure or structure from the bottom.
      • 455kHz—Built into StructureScan HD and SpotlightScan, 455kHz allows for scanning of a large range with picture-like detail.
      • 800kHz—Also built into StructureScan HD and SpotlightScan, 800kHz yields less range but even higher resolution detail than 455kHz.

Sonar Technology


CHIRP sonar is cutting edge echosounder technology. Unlike the single frequency of the Broadband Sounder technology, CHIRP continuously sweeps a spectrum of frequencies. Sweeping frequencies makes two improvements to the sonar image:

  • Better target separation- Because CHIRP uses a range of frequencies, rather than a single pulse, CHIRP sonar greatly improves the ability to distinguish fish targets that are very close together or on the bottom. Fish become easier to differentiate from the structure they are holding to.
  • Less interference from errant noise that would have been picked up by a single frequency sonar. CHIRP creates a unique range of frequencies and listens for only those sonar returns, this gives CHIRP sonar the ability to distinguish between what is a real echo, and what is just extra disturbances bouncing around underwater.

Broadband Sounder

Single frequency sonar—also referred to as Broadband—is commonly annotated as 50kHz, 83kHz, or 200kHz. Broadband is essential sonar technology at its finest. Broadband relies on pings and echoes from a single frequency. This technology is great for tracking bottom, finding schools of baitfish, displaying predator fish, and bait tracking.

StructureScan HD

StructureScan HD allows users to scan an area with a very high frequency signal, producing picture-like images. 455 and 800kHz frequency selections allow users to choose between 455 for scanning great ranges, and 800 for close-in, higher resolution detail. StructureScan HD literally turns the sonar paradigm on its side with the ability to search to the left and right of your boat rather than only below. StuctureScan HD imagery can be overlaid on top of cartography for a detailed, up-to-date view of structure in relation to your position. Called StructureMap™,this is excellent way to find underwater structure and changes in bottom layout.


SpotlightScan is boater-controlled directional sonar that allows anglers to scan an area they are interested in fishing while on approach. For use with cable-steer trolling motors, it aims two sonar signals similar to StructureScan HD in a specific direction. An angler can view productive fish-holding spots, such as drop-offs, channels, and underwater structure, before positioning a boat over top of them making it easier to find and cast to fish.

Product Manuals


Lowrance Quick Video Tips

Sonar Tutorial

Sonar Tutorialscrolling sonar
People have been fishing for thousands of years. Every person fishing has had the same problem - finding fish and getting them to bite. Although sonar can’t make the fish bite, it can solve the problem of finding fish. You can’t catch them if you’re not fishing where they are - and the Lowrance sonar will prove it 

In the late 1950s, Carl Lowrance and his sons Arlen and Darrell began scuba diving to observe fish and their habits. This research, substantiated by local and federal government studies, found that about 90 percent of the fish congregated in 10 percent of the water on inland lakes. As environmental conditions changed, the fish would move to more favorable areas. Their dives confirmed that most species of fish are affected by underwater structure (such as trees, weeds, rocks, and drop-offs), temperature, current, sunlight and wind. These and other factors also influence the location of food (baitfish, algae and plankton). Together, these factors create conditions that cause frequent relocation of fish populations.

During this time, a few people were using large, cumbersome sonar units on fishing boats. Working at low frequencies, these units used vacuum tubes which required car batteries to keep them running. Although they would show a satisfactory bottom signal and large schools of fish, they couldn’t show individual fish. Carl and his sons began to conceptualize a compact, battery operated sonar that could detect individual fish. After years of research, development, struggle and simple hard work, a sonar was produced that changed the fishing world forever.

 Out of this simple beginning, a new industry was formed in 1957 with the sale of the first transistorized sportfishing sonar. In 1959, Lowrance introduced “The Little Green Box,” which became the most popular sonar instrument in the world. All transistorized, it was the first successful sportfishing sonar unit. More than a million were made until 1984, when it was discontinued due to high production costs. We’ve come a long way since 1957.  From “little green boxes” to the latest in sonar and GPS technology, Lowrance continues to lead in the world of sportfishing sonar.

How it Works

The word "sonar" is an abbreviation for "SOund, NAvigation and Ranging." It was developed as a means of tracking enemy submarines during World War II.  A sonar consists of a transmitter, transducer, receiver and display.

In the simplest terms, an electrical impulse from a transmitter is converted into a sound wave by the transducer and sent into the water. When this wave strikes an object, it rebounds. This echo strikes the transducer, which converts it back into an electric signal, which is amplified by the receiver and sent to the display. Since the speed of sound in water is constant (approximately 4800 feet per second), the time lapse between the transmitted signal and the received echo can be measured and the distance to the object determined. This process repeats itself many times per second.

The frequencies most often used by Lowrance in our sonar are 192 - 200 kHz (kilohertz); we also make some units that use 50 kHz. Although these frequencies are in the sound spectrum, they’re inaudible to both humans and fish. (You don’t have to worry about the sonar unit spooking the fish - they can’t hear it.)

As mentioned earlier, the sonar unit sends and receives signals, then “prints” the echo on the display. Since this happens many times per second, a continuous line is drawn across the display, showing the bottom signal. In addition, echoes returned from any object in the water between the surface and bottom are also displayed. By knowing the speed of sound through water (4800 feet per second) and the time it takes for the echo to be received, the unit can show the depth of the water and any fish in the water.

Total System Performance

There are four facets to a good sonar unit:

  • High power transmitter.
  • Efficient transducer.
  • Sensitive receiver.
  • High resolution/contrast display. 

We call this our "Total System Performance" specification. All of the parts of this system must be designed to work together, under any weather condition and extreme temperatures.

High transmitter power increases the probability that you will get a return echo in deep water or poor water conditions. It also lets you see fine detail, such as bait fish and structure.

The transducer must not only be able to withstand the high power from the transmitter, but it also has to convert the electrical power into sound energy with little loss in signal strength. At the other extreme, it has to be able to detect the smallest of echoes returning from deep water or tiny bait fish.

The receiver also has an extremely wide range of signals it has to deal with. It must dampen the extremely high transmit signal and amplify the small signals returning from the transducer. It also has to separate targets that are close together into distinct, separate impulses for the display.

The display must have high resolution (vertical pixels) and good contrast to be able to show all of the detail crisply and clearly. This allows fish arches and fine detail to be shown.

Most Lowrance sonar units today operate at 192 or 200 kHz (kilohertz), with a few using 50 kHz. 

There are advantages to each frequency, but for almost all freshwater applications and most saltwater applications, 192 or 200 kHz is the best choice. It gives the best detail, works best in shallow water and at speed, and typically shows less "noise" and undesired echoes.  Target definition is also better with these higher frequencies.  This is the ability to display two fish as two separate echoes instead of one "blob" on the screen.

There are some applications where a 50 kHz frequency is best.  Typically, a 50 kHz sonar (under the same conditions and power) can penetrate water to deeper depths than higher frequencies.  This is due to water's natural ability to absorb sound waves.  The rate of absorption is greater for higher frequency sound than it is for lower frequencies.  Therefore, you'll generally find 50 kHz used in deeper saltwater applications.  Also, 50 kHz transducers typically have wider coverage angles than 192 or 200 kHz transducers. This characteristic makes them useful in tracking multiple downriggers.  Thus, even when these downriggers are in relatively shallow depths, 50 kHz is preferred by many fishermen.  In summary, the differences between these frequencies are:

192 or 200 kHz 50 kHz
  • Shallower depths.
  • Narrow cone angle.
  • Better definition and target separation.
  • Less noise susceptibility.
  • Deeper depths.
  • Wide cone angle.
  • Less definition and target separation.
  • More noise susceptibility.




The transducer is the sonar unit's "antenna." It converts electric energy from the transmitter to high frequency sound. The sound wave from the transducer travels through the water and bounces back from any object in the water. When the returning echo strikes the transducer, it converts the sound back into electrical energy which is sent to the sonar unit's receiver. The frequency of the transducer must match the sonar unit's frequency. In other words, you can't use a 50 kHz transducer or even a 200 kHz transducer on a sonar unit designed for 192 kHz! The transducer must be able to withstand high transmitter power impulses, converting as much of the impulse into sound energy as possible. At the same time, it must be sensitive enough to receive the smallest of echoes. All of this has to take place at the proper frequency and reject echoes at other frequencies. In other words, the transducer must be very efficient.

The active element in a transducer is a man-made crystal (lead zirconate or barium titanate). To make these crystals the chemicals are mixed, then poured into molds. These molds are then placed in an oven which "fires" the chemicals into the hardened crystals. Once they've cooled, a conductive coating is applied to two sides of the crystal. Wires are soldered to these coatings so the crystal can be attached to the transducer cable. The shape of the crystal determines both its frequency and cone angle. For round crystals (used by most sonar units), the thickness determines its frequency and the diameter determines the cone angle or angle of coverage (see Cone Angles section).  For example at 192 kHz, a 20 degree cone angle crystal is approximately one inch in diameter, whereas an eight degree cone requires a crystal that is about two inches in diameter. That's right. The larger the crystal's diameter - the smaller the cone angle. This is the reason why a twenty degree cone transducer is much smaller than an eight degree one - at the same frequency.

Transducers come in all shapes and sizes. Most transducers are made from plastic, but some thru-hull transducers are made from bronze. As shown in the previous section, frequency and cone angle determine the crystal's size. Therefore, the transducer's housing is determined by the size of the crystal inside.

For more information on transducer types and their applications see The Transducer Selection Guide.

Speed and the Transducer


Cavitation is a major obstacle to achieving high speed operation. If the flow of water around the transducer is smooth, then the transducer sends and receives signals normally. However, if the flow of water is interrupted by a rough surface or sharp edges, then the water flow becomes turbulent. So much so that air becomes separated from the water in the form of bubbles. This is called "cavitation." If these air bubbles pass over the face of the transducer (the part of the housing that holds the crystal), then "noise" is shown on the sonar unit's display. You see, a transducer is meant to work in water - not air. If air bubbles pass over the transducer's face, then the signal from the transducer is reflected by the air bubbles right back into it. Since the air is so close to the transducer, these reflections are very strong. They will interfere with the weaker bottom, structure, and fish signals, making them difficult or impossible to see.

The solution to this problem is to make a transducer housing that will allow the water to flow past it without causing turbulence. However, this is difficult due to the many constraints placed upon the modern transducer. It must be small, so that it doesn't interfere with the outboard motor or its water flow. It must be easy to install on the transom so that a minimum of holes need to be drilled. It must also "kick-up" without damage if struck by another object. Again, the patented design of the HS-WS transducer is Lowrance's latest improvement in high-speed transducer technology. It combines high speed operation with easy installation and will "kick-up" if struck by an object at high speed. 

The cavitation problem is not limited to the shape of the transducer housing. Many boat hulls create air bubbles that pass over the face of a transom mounted transducer. Many aluminum boats have this problem due to the hundreds of rivet heads that protrude into the water. Each rivet streams a river of air bubbles behind it when the boat is moving, especially at high speed. To fix this problem,  mount the face of the transducer below the air bubbles streaming from the hull. This typically means you have to mount the transducer's bracket as far down as possible on the transom.

Transducer Cone Angles
The transducer concentrates the sound into a beam. When a pulse of sound is transmitted from the transducer, it covers a wider area the deeper it travels. If you were to plot this on a piece of graph paper, you would find that it creates a cone shaped pattern, hence the term "cone angle."  The sound is strongest along the center line or axis of the cone and gradually diminishes as you move away from the center. 

In order to measure the transducer's cone angle, the power is first measured at the center or axis of the cone and then compared to the power as you move away from the center.  When the power drops to half (or -3db[decibels] in electronic terms), the angle from that center axis is measured. The total angle from the -3db point on one side of the axis to the -3db point on the other side of the axis is called the cone angle. 

This half power point (-3db) is a standard for the electronics industry and most manufacturers measure cone angle in this way, but a few use the -10db point where the power is 1/10 of the center axis power. This gives a greater angle, as you are measuring a point further away from the center axis. Nothing is different in transducer performance; only the system of measurement has changed. For example, a transducer that has an 8 degree cone angle at -3db would have a 16 degree cone angle at -10db.

Although the half power point is the standard for measuring cone angles, fish detection angles are much larger. Lowrance sonar units have very sensitive receivers and can detect return echoes from fish, structure or the bottom out to 60° or more. This means that the fish detection angle is 60° even though the cone angle is only 20°.

20 degree cone angle | 8 degree cone angle
Lowrance offers transducers with a variety of cone angles. Wide cone angles will show you more of the underwater world, at the expense of depth capability, since it spreads the transmitter's power out. Narrow cone angle transducers won't show you as much of what's around you, but will penetrate deeper than the wide cone. The narrow cone transducer concentrates the transmitter's power into a smaller area. A bottom signal on the sonar unit's display will be wider on a wide cone angle transducer than on a narrow one because you are seeing more of the bottom. The wide cone's area is much larger than the narrow cone.

High frequency (192 - 200 kHz) transducers come in either a narrow or wide cone angle.  The wide cone angle should be used for most freshwater applications and the narrow cone angle should be used for all saltwater applications.  Low frequency (50 kHz) sonar transducers are typically in the 30 to 45 degree range. Although a transducer is most sensitive inside its specified cone angle, you can also see echoes outside this cone; they just aren't as strong. The effective cone angle is the area within the specified cone where you can see echoes on the display. If a fish is suspended inside the transducer's cone, but the sensitivity is not turned up high enough to see it, then you have a narrow effective cone angle. You can vary the effective cone angle of the transducer by varying the receiver's sensitivity. With low sensitivity settings, the effective cone angle is narrow, showing only targets immediately beneath the transducer and a shallow bottom. Turning the sensitivity control up increases the effective cone angle, letting you see targets farther out to the sides. 

Water and Bottom Conditions
The type of water you're using the sonar in affects its operation to a large degree. Sound waves travel easily in a clear freshwater environment, such as most inland lakes. 

In salt water however, sound is absorbed and reflected by suspended material in the water. Higher frequencies are most susceptible to this scattering of sound waves and can't penetrate salt water nearly as well as lower frequencies. Part of the problem with salt water is that it's a very dynamic environment - the oceans of the world. Wind and currents constantly mix the water. Wave action creates and mixes air bubbles into the water near the surface, which scatters the sonar signal. Micro-organisms, such as algae and plankton, scatter and absorb the sonar signal. Minerals and salts suspended in the water do the same thing. Fresh water also has wind, currents and micro-organisms living in it that affect the sonar's signal - but not as severely as salt water.

Mud, sand and vegetation on the bottom absorb and scatter the sonar signal, reducing the strength of the return echo. Rock, shale, coral and other hard objects reflect the sonar signal easily. You can see the difference on your sonar's screen. A soft bottom, such as mud, shows as a thin line across the screen. A hard bottom, such as rock, shows as a wide line on the sonar's screen.


Soft Bottom |  Hard Bottom
You can compare sonar to using a flashlight in a dark room. Moving the light around the room, it's easily reflected from white walls and bright, hard objects. Moving the light onto a darkly carpeted floor returns less light because the dark color of the carpet absorbs the light, and the rough texture scatters it, returning less light to your eyes. Adding smoke to the room (children, don't try this at home!), you'll see even less. The smoke is equivalent to salt water's effect on the sonar signal.

Water Temperature and Thermodlcines

Water temperature has an important influence upon the activities of all fish. Fish are cold-blooded and their bodies are always the temperature of the surrounding water. During the winter, colder water slows down their metabolism. At this time, they need about a fourth as much food as they consume in the summer.

Most fish don't spawn unless the water temperature is within rather narrow limits. The surface water temperature gauge built into many of our sonar units helps identify the desired surface water spawning temperatures for various species. For example, trout can't survive in streams that get too warm. Bass and other fish eventually die out when stocked in lakes that remain too cold during the summer. While some fish have a wider temperature tolerance than others, each has a certain range within which it tries to stay. Schooling fish suspended over deep water lie at the level that provides this temperature. We assume they are the most comfortable here.


The temperature in a lake is seldom the same from the surface to the bottom. Usually there is a warm layer of water and a cooler layer. Where these layers meet is called a thermocline. The depth and thickness of the thermocline can vary with the season or time of day. In deep lakes there may be two or more thermoclines. This is important because many species of game fish like to suspend in, just above, or just below the thermocline. Many times bait fish will be above the thermocline while larger game fish will suspend in or just below it. Fortunately, this difference in temperatures can be seen on the sonar screen. The greater the temperature differential, the denser the thermocline shows on the screen.




After starting your boat, go to a protected cove and stop. Leave the engine on. You may want to take a partner along to operate the boat while you learn how to use the sonar. Press the sonar unit's ON key and idle slowly around the cove. You'll probably see a screen similar to the one to the left. The dashed line at the top of the screen represents the surface. The bottom shows in the lower part of the screen. The current water depth (33.9 feet) shows in the upper left corner of the screen. The depth range in this example is 0 to 40 feet. Since the unit is in the automatic mode, it continually adjusts the range, keeping the bottom signal on the display.

Fish-Symbol I.D.™


Every Lowrance LCG offers the convenience of our Advanced Fish-Symbol I.D.™. Activated by the press of a button, Advanced Fish Symbol I.D.™ lets your unit do the work of interpreting return sonar signals. Advanced Fish Symbol I.D.™ works in automatic mode only. If you turn it on while in manual mode, it will switch to automatic mode. Fish and other suspended targets are clearly displayed as fish-shaped symbols in four different sizes.

Advanced Fish Symbol I.D.™ is designed to give a simplified, easy to interpret display of suspended targets that are assumed to be fish. After gaining experience with your sonar, you will probably turn it off much of the time so you can see all of the detailed information on fish movement, thermoclines, schools of baitfish, weed beds, bottom structure, etc.

ASP™ (Advanced Signal Processing)
Advanced Signal Processing (ASP™) is another exclusive Lowrance innovation that uses sophisticated programming and advanced digital electronics to continually monitor the effects of boat speed, water conditions and other interference sources - and automatically adjusts the sonar settings to provide the clearest picture possible.

ASP™ sets the sensitivity as high as possible while keeping the screen free of "noise." It automatically balances sensitivity and noise rejection. The feature can be turned off and on and will work whether the sonar is in automatic or manual mode. With ASP™ operating behind the scenes you'll spend less time making routine sonar adjustments and more time spotting fish.

The sensitivity controls the ability of the unit to pick up echoes. A low sensitivity level excludes much of the bottom information, fish signals, and other target information. High sensitivity levels enable you to see this detail, but it can also clutter the screen with many undesirable signals. Typically, the best sensitivity level shows a good solid bottom signal with GRAYLINE® and some surface clutter. When in the automatic mode, the sensitivity is automatically adjusted to keep a solid bottom signal displayed, plus a little more. This gives the unit the capability to show fish and other detail. In automatic mode, the unit also adjusts sensitivity automatically for water conditions, depth, etc.  When you adjust the sensitivity up or down, you are biasing up or down the normal setting the unit's automatic control would choose. With ASP™ enabled, the automatic mode picks the proper sensitivity level for 95% of all situations, so it is recommend to always use this normal mode first. But, for those unusual situations where it is warranted you can bias it up or down. You can also turn off the automatic sensitivity control for special uses.

To properly adjust the sensitivity while the unit is in the manual mode, first change the range to double its current setting. For example, if the range is 0 - 40 feet, change it to 0 - 80 or 0 - 100 feet. Now increase the sensitivity until a second bottom echo appears at twice the depth of the actual bottom signal. This "second echo" is caused by the echo returning from the bottom reflecting off the surface of the water, making a second trip to the bottom and returning. Since it takes twice as long for this echo to make two trips to the bottom and back, it shows at twice the depth of the actual bottom. Now change the range back to the original scale. You should see more echoes on the screen. If there is too much noise on the screen, back the sensitivity level down a step or two. 

GRAYLINE® lets you distinguish between strong and weak echoes. It "paints" gray on targets that are stronger than a preset value. This allows you to tell the difference between a hard and soft bottom. For example, a soft, muddy or weedy bottom returns a weaker symbol which is shown with a narrow or no gray line. A hard bottom returns a strong signal which causes a wide gray line. 

If you have two signals of equal size, one with gray and the other without, then the target with gray is the stronger signal. This helps distinguish weeds from trees on the bottom or fish from structure.

GRAYLINE® is adjustable. Since GRAYLINE® shows the difference between strong and weak signals, adjusting the sensitivity may also require a different GRAYLINE® level.


You may see fish arches while trolling with the unit in a 0 - 60 foot scale, however it it much easier to see the arches when using the zoom feature. This enlarges all echoes on the screen. Turning the zoom feature on gives you a screen similar to the one at left. The range is 8 - 38 feet, a 30-foot zoom. As you can see, all targets have been enlarged, including the bottom signal. Fish arches (A & B) are much easier to detect, and important structure (C) near the bottom is magnified. This also shows small fish hanging just beneath the surface clutter (D). The above steps are all that's required to manually adjust your sonar unit for optimum fish finding capability. After you've become more familiar with your unit, you'll be able to adjust the sensitivity properly without having to look for a second echo.

Fish Arches
One of the most common questions that we receive is "How do I get fish arches to show on my screen?" It's really pretty simple to do, but it does require attention to detail, not only in the way you make the adjustments to the unit, but to the whole sonar installation. 

It also helps to see the Why Fish Arch section below. This explains how arches are created on your sonar's screen.

Screen Resolution
The number of vertical pixels that the screen is capable of showing is called Screen Resolution. The more vertical pixels on a sonar's screen, the easier it will be for it to show fish arches. This plays an important role in a sonar unit's capability to show fish arches. The chart below lists the pixel sizes and area they represent down to 50 feet for two different screens. 

0-10 feet 1.2 inches   0-10 feet 0.5 inches
0-20 feet 2.4 inches   0-20 feet 1.0 inches
0-30 feet 3.6 inches   0-30 feet 1.5 inches
0-40 feet 4.8 inches   0-40 feet 2.0 inches
0-50 feet 6.0 inches   0-50 feet 2.5 inches


As you can see, one pixel represents a larger volume of water with the unit in the 0 - 100 foot range than it does with the unit in the 0 - 10 foot range. For example, if a sonar has 100 pixels vertically, with a range of 0 - 100 feet, each pixel is equal to a depth of 12 inches. A fish would have to be pretty large to show up as an arch at this range. However, if you zoom the range to a 30-foot zoom (for example from 80 to 110 feet), each pixel is now equal to 3.6 inches. Now the same fish will probably be seen as an arch on the screen due to the zoom effect. The size of the arch depends on the size of the fish - a small fish will show as a small arch, a larger fish will make a larger arch, and so on. Using a sonar unit with a small number of vertical pixels in very shallow water, a fish directly off the bottom will appear as a straight line separate from the bottom. This is because of the limited number of dots at that depth. If you are in deep water (where the fish signal is displayed over a larger distance of boat travel), zooming the display into a 20 or 30 foot window around the bottom shows fish arches near the bottom or structure. This is because you have reduced the pixel size in a larger cone.


Chart Speed
The scrolling or chart speed can also affect the type of arch displayed on the screen. The faster the chart speed, the more pixels are turned on as the fish passes through the cone. This will help display a better fish arch. (However, the chart speed can be turned up too high. This stretches the arch out. Experiment with the chart speed until you find the setting that works best for you.)

Transducer Installation
If you still don't get good fish arches on the screen, it could be the transducer's mounting is incorrect. If the transducer is mounted on the transom, adjust it until its face is pointing straight down when the boat is in the water. If it is angled, the arch won't appear on the screen properly. If the arch slopes up but not down, then the front of the transducer is too high and needs to be lowered. If only the back half of the arch is printed, the nose of the transducer is angled too low and needs to be raised.

Fish Arch Review

1. Sensitivity
Automatic operation with Advanced Signal Processing (ASP™) turned on should give you the proper sensitivity settings but, if necessary, the sensitivity may be increased.

2. Target Depth 
The depth of the fish can determine if the fish will arch on the screen. If the fish is in shallow water, the fish is not in the cone angle very long, making it difficult to show an arch. Typically, the deeper the fish, the easier it is to show an arch.

3. Boat Speed 
The boat's engine should be in gear at an idle or just above. Experiment with your boat to find the best throttle location for good arches. Usually, a slow trolling speed works best.

4. Chart Speed 
Use at least 3/4 chart speed or higher.

5. Zoom Size 
If you see markings that are possible fish, but they do not arch, zoom in on them. Using the zoom function lets you effectively increase the screen's resolution.

Final Notes on Fish Arches
Very small fish probably will not arch at all. Because of water conditions such as heavy surface clutter or thermoclines, the sensitivity sometimes cannot be turned up enough to get fish arches. For the best results, turn the sensitivity up as high as possible without getting too much noise on the screen. In medium to deep water, this method should work to display fish arches.

A school of fish will appear as many different formations or shapes, depending on how much of the school is within the transducer's cone. In shallow water, several fish close together appear like blocks that have been stacked in no apparent order. In deep water, each fish will arch according to its size.

Why Fish Arch
The reason fish show as an arch is because of the relationship between the fish and the cone angle of the transducer as the boat passes over the fish. As the leading edge of the cone strikes the fish, a display pixel is turned on. As the boat passes over the fish, the distance to the fish decreases. This turns each pixel on at a shallower depth on the display. When the center of the cone is directly over the fish, the first half of the arch is formed. This is also the shortest distance to the fish. Since the fish is closer to the boat, the signal is stronger and the arch is thicker. As the boat moves away from the fish, the distance increases and the pixels appear at progressively deeper depths until the cone passes the fish.

If the fish doesn't pass directly through the center of the cone, the arch won't be as well defined. Since the fish isn't in the cone very long, there aren't as many echoes to display, and the ones that do show are weaker. This is one of the reasons it's difficult to show fish arches in shallow water. The cone angle is too narrow for the signal to arch.

Remember, there must be movement between the boat and the fish to develop an arch. Usually, this means trolling at a slow speed with the main engine. If you are anchored or stopped, fish signals won't arch. Instead, they'll show as horizontal lines as they swim in and out of the cone.

Actual On-The-Water Chart Recordings
The following chart records are from a Lowrance X-85 liquid crystal graph sonar. It has 3000 watts of transmitter power, a 240 x 240 pixel screen and operates at 192 kHz. 

X-85 Sample 1


This shows a split-screen view of the water beneath the boat. The range on the right side of the screen is 0 - 60 feet. On the left, the screen has a 30-foot "zoom" rangeof 9 to 39 feet. Since the unit is in the automatic mode, (shown by the word "auto" at the top center of the screen) it picked the ranges to keep the bottom signal on the screen at all times. The water depth is 35.9 feet.

The unit was used with an HS-WSBK "Skimmer®" transducer mounted on the transom. The sensitivity level was adjusted to 93% or higher. Chart speed was one step below maximum.

A. Surface Clutter 
The markings at the top of the screen can extend many feet below the surface. This is called Surface Clutter. It's caused by many things, including air bubbles created by wind and wave action or boat wakes, bait fish, plankton and algae. Many times larger fish will be seen feeding on the bait fish and other food near the surface.

GRAYLINE® is used to outline the bottom contour which might otherwise be hidden beneath trees and brush. It can also give clues to the composition of the bottom. A hard bottom returns a very strong signal, causing a wide gray line. A soft, muddy or weedy bottom returns a weaker signal which is shown with a narrow gray line. The bottom on this screen is hard, composed mainly of rock.

C. Structure 
Generally, the term "structure" is used to identify trees, brush, and other objects rising from the bottom that aren't part of the actual bottom. On this screen, "C" is probably a tree rising from the bottom. This record was taken from a man-made lake. Trees were left standing in several areas when the lake was built, creating natural habitats for many game fish.

D. Fish Arches 
The X-85 has a significant advantage over many competitive units in that it can show individual fish with the characteristic arched mark on the screen. (See Why Fish Arch for more information.) On this screen, there are several large fish holding just off the bottom at "D," while smaller fish are hanging in the middle of the screen and near the structure.

E. Other Elements
The large, partial arch shown at "E" is not a fish. We were trolling near the entrance to a cove that had hundreds of tires banded together with wire cables. Other cables anchored the tires to the bottom. The large arch at "E" was created when we passed over one of the large cables that anchored the tires.

X-85 Sample 2

This shows a full-screen zoom view of the water beneath the boat. The range is 8 - 38 feet, which gives a 30-foot zoom. Since the unit is in the automatic mode, (shown by the word "auto" at the top center of the screen) it picked the ranges to keep the bottom signal on the screen at all times. The water depth is 34.7 feet.

The unit was used with an HS-WSBK "Skimmer®" transducer mounted on the transom. The sensitivity level was adjusted to 93% or higher. Chart speed was one step below maximum.

A and B. Fish Arches
The X-85 has a significant advantage over many competitive units in that it can show individual fish with the characteristic arched mark on the screen. (See Why Fish Arch for more information.) On this screen, there are several large fish holding just off the bottom at "B", while an even larger fish "A" is hanging directly above them.

C. Structure 
Generally, the term "structure" is used to identify trees, brush, and other objects rising from the bottom that aren't part of the actual bottom. On this screen, "C" is probably a large tree or trees rising from the bottom. This record was taken from a man-made lake. Trees were left standing in several areas when the lake was built, creating natural habitats for many game fish.

D. Surface Clutter
Surface Clutter "D" at the top of the screen extends below 12 feet in places. Small fish can be seen beneath the surface clutter. They are probably feeding.

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